Why Did My Credit Score Go Down & How Can I Fix It?

Why Did My Credit Score Go Down & How Can I Fix It?

Have you ever seen that episode of Black Mirror where the number of followers you have on social media determined whether you could purchase a car or be accepted into a prestigious apartment complex? This is essentially how credit scores work. 

 

A credit score can help you get a loan, buy a car, or rent a condo. If you have poor credit, this could close a lot of doors for you and affect your financial freedom. 

 

Maintaining good financial standing is no easy feat. The slightest dip can affect you in unforeseen ways. What’s worse, you might be scratching your head in confusion over why your score dropped and what you can do to boost it back up.  

 

Let’s go through some factors as to why your credit score has dropped and what you can do to repair your score. Don’t fret, while the idea of a poor credit score may seem scary, you are in control of it and this article will help you understand why and how. 

 

What are the Reasons Why Your Credit Score Dropped? 

You Missed a Payment/Are Late on a Payment

Life gets in the way. While you are pretty consistent when it comes to making your payments on time, there are some months where you either forget because you’re so busy or other financial obligations require you to skip a payment. This can cause a dip in your credit score as late payments make up a large portion of your credit score. 

Your Credit Card Limit Was Lowered

Credit card companies reserve the right to lower your credit line, especially if you’ve made a habit of being late on payments. Something like this can explain the drop in your credit score as it will increase your debt-to-credit ratio. 

It’s recommended to keep this to 30% of your credit limit and under. 

You’ve Closed a Credit Card Recently why does credit score drop

While you may have cut up a card and said that you were done with your addiction to shopping, closing an account doesn’t always work in your favor. It’s an incorrect state of mind to think that closing a credit card will benefit you. 

 

This may sound crazy, but the best thing to do is to pay off your credit card entirely and keep the account open. Put your card in a drawer or use it very sparingly. 

Did You Apply for New Credit?

If you’ve applied for a new credit card, a home loan, or any sort of loan, this can cause your credit score to drop. It’s unfortunate, but it happens. 

 

When a card issuer assesses your credit report, this is known as a “hard pull.” Unfortunately, this can lead to a slight drop in your credit score, whether you are approved or not for the credit card.

Made a Large Purchase

While you are given a maximum amount on your credit line, it’s never good to max out your credit card or come close to it. Especially if you’ve made a single large purchase. 

 

This shows that you are not utilizing your card properly and can sometimes communicate to credit bureaus that you have no intention of paying your credit card off or it could be difficult to pay off in a timely manner. 

Identify Theft Can Hurt Your Score

While you may think to yourself ‘I didn’t make these purchases, someone else did’, you could still end up paying for these fraudulent charges. Identity theft drops your credit score. Regularly check your account regularly to ensure all of the purchases on your card was actually made by you. 

Did You Pay Off a Loan?

I know what you’re thinking. You just paid off a loan early. You accomplished a longtime goal. Job well done! You no longer have to worry about holding the weight of that burden on your shoulders. Something like this can cause your credit score to drop. 

Credit Report Errors

In the end, people and technology are flawed. Mistakes happen. If an error occurs, even when it’s ultimately not your doing, your credit score can be negatively impacted. It’s frustrating, especially when you have been doing so well in maintaining a good credit standing. 

 

Paying an installment loan off early won’t necessarily improve your credit score, and keeping it open for the life of the loan may be a better strategy. 

 

credit dropped

How Can You Raise Your Credit? 

So, your credit score is not where you envisioned it would be. As we said before, there is no reason to panic. Do not reserve yourself to thinking that you will always be at this score for the rest of your life. 

 

No brand new car. No nice house in the suburbs. You can raise your credit score, and in this section, we will be going over how to do just that because it is possible. 

Make On-Time Payments

This point is a little bit of ‘hitting the nail on the head,’ but if it wasn’t obvious already, you should try your best to make your payments on time everytime. Even if you pay $5 more than the minimum and go at a steady pace for a while, it is better to make your payments on time instead of letting your payments build up.  

Don’t Use Your Credit Card Too Much

The idea of a credit card is tempting. You don’t have enough money in your bank account for those new pair of shoes, but you have room on your credit card. 

 

So, you get the shoes. Then you get a jacket. Then you pay for a fancy meal out with friends. 

 

Overusing your card on a very consistent basis is not good, so make sure you are aware of how often you swipe that card. 

Don’t Close Your Credit Cards

As mentioned before, it may seem like a good idea to close a credit card and not tempt yourself. You are doing more harm than good this way. Keep your credit card open and be mindful of when you should and when you shouldn’t use it. 

Raise Red Flags on Credit Report Errors

If you see something on your credit report that doesn’t look right, don’t let it just sit there and fester. Dispute this error before it can affect your credit score too badly. 

changes in credit scoreDon’t Apply for a Loan 

While you are trying to raise your credit score, do not apply for a loan. This may seem like a viable solution for helping you escape your credit card debt, but you will drop your score by doing so. While you are looking to boost your score and pay off debts, hold off on any loans.  

Request A Credit Line Increase

As mentioned earlier, maxing out your credit card is no bueno. You may feel like requesting a credit line increase is tempting, but you may want to take advantage of the opportunity. By doing so, your credit card balance will be further away from the maximum and not threatening to drop your score. 

Bring in a Credit Repair Company

When you feel like you are unsure of how to go about raising your credit score, then it’s time to bring in a credit repair company. These are the experts who do this for a living. 

 

While you may feel like you are out of options and your wheels are just spinning in place, a credit repair company will devise a customized solution to fit your exact needs and help you move forward. These experts will get you back on track and you can take a big sigh of relief.

 

When it comes to improving your credit score, remember that it is not a sprint, but a marathon. It will take some time to see results, which could be discouraging, but should actually be promising. 

 

You should know that while you may not see changes right away, you are taking the right steps that will pay off in the end. With the help of the tips listed above, along with a credit repair company, you will be on your way to a fixed credit score and leaving bad credit behind.

How Do Banks Control & Monitor Credit Limits?

How Do Banks Control & Monitor Credit Limits?

When your new credit comes in the mail you’re given a paper listing your credit limit. Every so often, if you’re a good borrower, you can increase your credit limit. However, have you ever wondered how this credit limit is even decided?

 

The method used by credit card companies to determine your credit limit is called underwriting. Underwriting works via mathematical formulas besides testing and analysis. But, the exact details of how this works is kept tightly under wraps by each institution since it’s how these companies make their money.

 

In this article, we do our best to shed some light on credit limits, how they’re determined, and your credit limit is affected by your credit score.

 

What Is A Credit Limit?

Simply put, a credit limit is the maximum amount of money you can spend on your credit card. While a high limit allows you to purchase more expensive items, offers you more flexibility, and can improve your credit score, it can also get you into trouble easily if you get buried in credit card debt.

 

Remember:

 

How much of your credit you use determines a portion of your credit score. It’s wise to have more available credit than you’re using to keep your credit score high.

 

While most Americans have credit cards, few of them think much about their credit limit, which is one reason so many of them get into trouble with their credit cards. Fortunately, it’s easy today to get a handle on your credit limit with the many apps available that assist you in managing your credit cards.

 

If you don’t have a smartphone or prefer not to use an app to achieve this, you can use the card issuer’s website to get this helpful information. Most of these sites will give you your balance and your limit at a glance so you know exactly where you stand.

 

If you don’t have access to an app or a website, you should be able to find this information on your statement each month.

 

How Are Credit Limits Determined?

Stated by a credit repair company in Austin, when a company sets a credit limit, it’s a sign of how much they trust the borrower to pay back what they owe. If you’re given a high limit, it means the bank thinks you’re low risk and are likely to pay off your debt and make timely payments. You’re considered a good borrower.

 

However, if you don’t look like a low-risk borrower to the bank, they’ll give you a low limit to start. If you pay your debts responsibly, the bank or card issuer may raise your limit after a set time. After some time, you can also request to increase your credit limit, if need be.

The Role Of Credit History

A major determining factor in your credit limit is your credit history. When you apply for a credit card, the card issuer checks things like your annual income and your credit report to determine what your limit will be.

limited by credit score

 

When they look at your credit report, they factor in your repayment history, your credit history length, and how many credit accounts you have open. Open credit accounts include other credit cards, mortgages, student loans, auto loans, and personal loans.

 

Card issuers also look to see if you have any derogatory information on your credit report. Bad marks on your report could be things like bankruptcies, missed payments, late payments, tax liens, or accounts that have gone into collections.

Other Items That Factor In Your Credit Score

 

While the underwriting process is different depending on the company, many consider identical variables in determining your limit. Some items they consider are the credit limits on your other accounts and your work history.

 

Your debt to income ratio also plays a role. If you have a lengthy work history and low debt to income, you’ll be seen as low risk and most likely be given a higher limit.

 

If you apply for a card and don’t get the credit limit you were hoping for, it’s most likely something in your credit report that’s holding you back. That’s why it’s a good idea to check your report regularly to know where you stand and what you can do to improve your credit score.

 

How Do Credit Limits Affect Credit Scores?

While credit card limits affect how much purchasing power you have, they also directly impact your credit score. One of the ways it does this is mentioned above in your credit utilization ratio or known as debt to credit ratio. This ratio is important as it comprises 30% of your FICO credit score.

 

People with low credit limits get into trouble easily with credit utilization, which is why it’s best to strive for higher limits. If you have high credit utilization, it reflects poorly on your credit score.

 

However:

 

Remember that every credit report is different, and just because you brought your ratio down and it reflects positively on one report, it doesn’t mean it’ll do the same on another.

 

Still, it’s wise to keep your credit utilization ratio low when possible. How low? Well, many experts say under 30% is a good number to aim for.

 

A good way to increase your score and lower your credit utilization ratio is to ask for an increase in your credit limit but keep your card usage the same.

Monitoring Credit Limit

What About Going Over Limit?

We probably don’t have to tell you this, but going over your limit is a bad move. Going over the limit takes your credit utilization to over 100%, and that’s a bad place to be in.

 

Most items, your credit card company will just deny the transaction that puts you over your limit, however, some don’t. Some card issuers allow users to opt into an over the limit coverage whereby they pay a fee if they go over and the card issuer honors the transaction.

 

Still, even if you have this protection, it’s best not to go down that road.

 

Besides hurting your credit, going over the limit puts you at risk for having your limit decreased or your account closed by the card issuer. Also, being over the limit may cause your card issuer to increase your interest rate. So, avoid going over whatever you do.

 

It’s important to understand how credit limits work and how they impact your credit score. Equally important is staying on top of your credit score to know where you stand. There are many apps available right from your smartphone that let you access your credit score and show you where you need to improve.

 

Are you getting your phone out now?

 

 

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Best Credit Score for Buying or Leasing Your Dream Car

Best Credit Score for Buying or Leasing Your Dream Car

Almost everyone needs a car in our daily lives whether to take you to work or to drive your kids to school. In most cities, it is essential to getting from point A to point B. If you don’t have one yet, you might be wondering whether it’s better to lease or buy one outright. 

 

However, before making any large purchases like a vehicle, it’s helpful to know your credit score so you can find out what kind of loan you can get approved for and what kind of interest rate you will be dealing with. 

 

In this article, we look at the credit scores you need to lease or purchase a vehicle so you can better plan to get your dream car. 

 

What Credit Score You Need To Lease A Car

Stated by a credit repair Dallas expert, the advantages of leasing a car versus buying one outright are that you generally get lower monthly payments. Some experts say you can get anywhere from 30% to 60% lower payments versus buying a car. Another big advantage is that you have warranty protection for the entire time you drive the car. 

 

However:

Leasing a vehicle is like buying because you still need a decent credit score. According to Nerdwallet, “the average score for customers staring a new lease was 722. If your score is 680 or above, you’ll likely have attractive offers.”

 

Credit scores above 740 are considered excellent by lenders, and those with scores 740 and over get the best rates and deals regardless of whether they purchase or lease. 

 

But, what if your score isn’t so hot? 

 

Well, according to LeaseGuide.com, if you have a score between 620-679, you’re still in the ballpark for getting a lease. However, while you’re more than likely to be approved with those numbers, you may get a higher interest rate.

 

Now, if your score is below 619, it’s considered ‘sub-prime’ or fair credit. If you have a score in this range, you may or may not get accepted to lease. And if you do, you’ll likely pay a high-interest rate. 

 

If you have a sub-prime score, you’re better off taking a few months to improve that number before you go shopping for a new vehicle, if you can. Keep in mind that lease requirements always change and vary among auto manufacturers. It’s important to note that market conditions play a factor in whether or not you get approved depending on your score. 

 

credit for car loan

 

Credit Score For Buying A Car

Buying a car has its own advantages over leasing. While you do pay higher monthly payments, you have the benefit of owning a vehicle when you’ve paid it off, and can sell the vehicle when you choose to get another one.  

 

Also, you have the advantage of being able to modify the vehicle if you want without the fear of breaking a contract. 

 

But buying a car is similar to leasing because you still need to have a decent credit score to get a loan. Again, according to Nerdwallet.com, “the average credit score to buy a new car is 713; it’s 656 for a used-car loan.”

 

If your score is in the low 700s or below, expect to have a difficult time getting a loan. You’ll probably have to answer questions about negative entries in your credit report and have to jump through hoops to prove your income and verify payment history.

 

While it’s possible to get an auto loan with bad credit, which is defined as a score below 600, it’s unlikely. And if you do get approved, you’ll pay very high-interest rates. 

 

As with leasing, if your credit score is bad, you’re better off spending six months to a year rebuilding your credit score back up if you can afford to wait. 

 

How To Improve Your Credit Score

As you can see, having a good credit score is essential to getting good terms on a lease or car purchase. But if you have less than perfect credit, all hope isn’t lost. There are steps you can take to beef up your score and it doesn’t take as long as you may think.

 

To know what your credit score means, it’s helpful to know how that number is calculated. Credit scores are three-digit numbers that help lenders know how credit-worthy you are. There’s no uniform algorithm that’s used by everyone, which is why you may have different scores from different reporting agencies. 

 

Credit reporting agencies look at a variety of factors to come up with that number, including your payment history, your credit usage, whether your accounts are delinquent, etc. 

improve credit for car

 

First and foremost:

 

The number one thing you can do to improve your score right away is to make your payments on time from now on. Your payment history is the biggest factor that goes into your credit score.

 

 

Even if you’ve been late before, start making every payment on time even if it’s the minimum. 

 

The next thing you can do to improve your credit score is to pay off your debts and credit cards. The debt to credit ratio or credit utilization ratio is the second biggest factor that goes into your credit score. Do everything you can to bring down those credit card and loan balances quickly to send your score in the right direction.

 

Another way to better your score is to not take on any more debt if you can afford it. It seems counterintuitive since you’re trying to take on a car loan, but when you apply for new credit, your score takes a hit. That’s why it’s best to get your score as high as you can before taking on a car loan or lease payment. 

 

The bottom line to take away from this article is that your credit score is very important whether you want to get an auto loan, home loan, or any other type of credit. If you’re in the market for a new vehicle, your best bet is to examine your credit to see where you stand. 

 

Then, if you think you need to make improvements, do so first before you attempt to get a loan. Getting a loan with a high credit score gives you more favorable terms and makes it more likely you’ll be approved. 

 

Credit Cards & Interests Rates: How One Affects The Other

Credit Cards & Interests Rates: How One Affects The Other

Having good credit and a good credit score is important to your financial well-being and your life. Having credit allows you to purchase things you need, such as homes and automobiles and can even help you get an apartment or a cell phone contract. Your credit history and your score affect your ability to borrow money, and it affects the interest rate you’ll pay, which can make it easier or harder for you to pay off your loans. 

 

In this article, we look at why having a good credit score is important, and how your score affects your interest rate.

What Is Your Credit Score?

Your credit score is a number that’s derived from your credit history. This number tells lenders how much of a risk you are when deciding to lend you money or extend lines of credit to you. 

 

Since this number is one of the main factors taken into consideration, you need to work hard to maintain a good credit score, because having bad credit lessens the chance you’ll be able to borrow money, and increases the chance of borrowing money with unfavorable terms. 

 

How Companies Determine Credit Scores

The information in your credit report is what’s used to determine your credit score, and it’s vital you understand what information credit reporting agencies consider so you can take steps to improve your score if needed.

 

There are 5 pieces of information that determine a credit score: Payment History, Amount Owed, Credit History, Types of Credit, and New Credit. 

Payment History

Your payment history comprises the largest percentage (40%) of your credit score. The information a credit reporting agency uses to factor in payment history is the number of accounts you have versus how many payments you’ve made on time. 

 

Also:

 

The number of accounts that are 30 days or more delinquent factors into this. 

 

Reporting agencies take into account whether you’ve filed for bankruptcy or had an account go into collections. Making every payment on time is the most important thing you can do to maintain your good credit and to build it up if it’s not where you want it to be.

Amount Owed

The next factor that goes into your credit score (30%) is the amount you owe on your accounts. The credit reporting agency looks at your spending habits and the amount of money you owe to determine if making payments is sustainable should you encounter financial hardship. Factors that determine the amount owed are the number of accounts in which you have a balance, how much credit you’ve used, and how much you owe on all of your cards and loans. 

 

As with making on-time payments, paying down debt goes a long way to improving your credit score and is easy to do if you pay more than the minimum payment every month. 

Credit History

How long you’ve had credit cards and other forms of credit is another factor that goes into your credit score. For example, if you have, say, five years of on-time payments with a credit card, it looks better than if you only had an account for a few months. The longer your credit history, the better the risk you’re seen as for lenders

 

Therefore, it’s important you keep your old credit cards instead of cutting them up. Use them for small purchases to keep them active and pay off the balance at the end of the month to maintain a long credit history.  

Types of Credit

Lenders like to see a variety of credit accounts, which is why you should have loans, retail cards, and bank cards instead of only credit cards. Having more variety in your types of credit shows you’re a well-rounded borrower. 

New Credit

The last bit of information that credit reporting agencies consider when determining your score is the new lines of credit you opened up recently. Factors in this include how long it’s been since you’ve opened a new account, the number of ‘hard pulls’ to your credit you had in the last year, and how long it’s been since you last had an inquiry into your credit report. 

 

interest rate for credit card

Credit & Interest Rates

Now that you know about what makes up your credit score, let’s look at how that score affects your interest rate. 

Lenders & Numbers

So, when you apply for credit, your lender looks at the credit score given to them by one of the major credit reporting agencies. Credit scores usually range from 300 to 850 and the number that comes back to the lender affects the interest rate they’ll offer.

 

A high score tells the lender you’re low risk and that you’ll most likely make payments on time and won’t default on the loan. This means you’ll usually get a lower interest rate, and some lenders may reduce the amount you have to put down for a mortgage or an auto loan. 

 

However, lower scores (usually below 620) means you’ll probably get a high-interest rate or may not get a loan at all. Many lenders look at scores above 670 to be good, so if you’re below that, you’re better off improving your score before you apply for a loan. 

 

Building Your Score

Let’s say your score is less than perfect, and you want to get a mortgage or car loan. As mentioned, you’re better off improving your credit score before applying for a loan to get better terms and here’s how to do that.

 

  • Make your payments on time. Even if you’ve missed in the past, start making them on time every month from here on out.
  • Reduce the credit to debt ratio to be 30% or lower.
  • Pay off your high balances as quickly as possible; make more than the minimum payment to do this.
  • Get a copy of your credit report and make sure there are no errors that can drive your score down.
  • Get help from a credit counselor to help rebuild your credit.

 

Many people get into trouble with credit because they don’t understand how it works. If you can avoid it, don’t carry over balances from month to month. Be smart about using your credit, make your payments on time and you should have no trouble when it comes time to get a mortgage or loan. 

 

 

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Thinking of an Apartment or Home in Austin? Here Are the Credit Scores You Need for Good Terms

Thinking of an Apartment or Home in Austin? Here Are the Credit Scores You Need for Good Terms

So, you’re thinking of buying a home or renting an apartment in the Austin area? Are you moving into Austin and need a place to live? Well, the housing market here is robust, but getting a good deal on an apartment or favorable terms on a home loan depends on having a good credit score

 

This article will provide a picture of what the Austin home market is like, and what kind of credit score you might need to get a place you’ll love.

Current Housing Market in Austin

Stated by credit repair Austin experts, while housing prices across the country are dipping as of 2019, and properties are lingering on the market longer than before, some local markets are thriving, which means there’s fierce competition for buyers and renters alike. 

 

The real estate market here in Austin is one such market, and it ranks as one of the hottest in 2019 and looks to get even better in 2020. According to Zillow, median home values in the Austin area grew by over 6% as of June 2019, and most experts expect that growth to continue, albeit more slowly, over the next year.

 

Because of a thriving job market, values for homes in Austin have continued to grow since 2012, and while this trend is the same for many major metro areas, Austin is one of the strongest. 

 

While many homes stay on the market longer in other areas — some up to 50 days or more — here in Austin, the average time for a home to be on the market is 12 days, which indicates a healthy housing market with a lot of potential.

 

One of the major driving factors in the Austin housing market is the incredible population growth as it ranks consistently as one of the best places to live.

 

Another factor that drives up value here in Austin is the supply/demand ratio when compared to other cities in Texas. 

 

According to the Home Buying Institute:

 

As of May 2019, the Austin area had less than a two-month supply of homes for sale. A “balanced” real estate market has closer to five or six months worth of supply. 

 

austin housing market

What About Affordability?

With a population that’s growing and an economy that’s booming, it’s no surprise that homebuyers and apartment hunters are concerned about affordable housing. 

 

Although home prices in Austin are climbing and continue to climb, many experts say Austin is still one of the more affordable places when compared to more saturated markets like San Diego and Seattle.

 

Still, experts advise that if you’re planning on relocating to Austin, you’re going to have your work cut out for you because there is a high demand and low inventory. 

 

The competition for housing is fierce, which is why it’s advised that you start looking for a house or apartment as soon as possible to give yourself plenty of time to find the right place at the right price. 

 

Since homes do not sit on the market long in Austin, deciding to wait or ‘think about it’ may mean losing a property to someone else who’s ready to buy. 

 

Lastly, take advantage of low mortgage rates, which have decreased dramatically over the last few years. The average rate for a 30 year fixed mortgage loan decreased to 3.8% as of June 2019. But to get these low rates, you’re going to need a good credit score, which takes us to the next topic.

What Credit Score Do You Need For A Home in Austin?

So, if you’re looking for a home, it’s essential you examine your credit score before you apply for a loan. Your credit score is a significant determinant factor in whether or not you get a loan and what terms you get with interest rates. 

credit score for austin home

The higher your score, the more favorable terms you’ll get, and the lower the down payment you’ll need.

 

While there are a variety of home loans you can apply for, in general, the average credit score for Texas first time home buyers is 671, according to Credit Karma. However, the credit score you need depends on the type of loan you’re getting. 

 

For example:

 

With an FHA Loan, you may be able to get that with a score of 580 or above. A VA Loan can be had with a score of 620 or more. A USDA Loan can be gotten with a score of 640 or above, and a conventional loan can be gotten with a score of 620 or above.

What About Renting?

If you’re interested in renting an apartment, your score is still important, but not as much as when you’re getting a loan. Most people or companies who are renting out apartments will expect you to have a score of 620+. 

 

However, because Austin is a hot market, and demand is high, rental companies and landlords may want to see scores over 700.

 

While landlords differ in what they look for, generally speaking, they want to know about your income and your credit history to show them you have the money to pay your rent and you’re responsible for making your payments on time.

 

Just like a low score may get you denied for a home loan, so too will a low score get you denied for an apartment.

 

Because your credit score is so important when renting or buying, it’s essential that you do all that you can to improve your credit score if it’s not where you want it to be before you begin shopping. Once you start shopping head over to Craft Apartment Locators in Austin to locate your new apartment today!

 

The best way to improve a low score is to start making all of your payments on time and pay off your debt as quickly as possible. If you need help, contact a credit repair company to get you back on track to get you into the home of your dreams.

 

How Your Credit Score Affects Home Loans For The Dallas Housing Market

How Your Credit Score Affects Home Loans For The Dallas Housing Market

By now, everyone should know that your credit score plays a crucial role in deciding whether or not you get a home loan and how favorable the terms are to you. Dallas continues to grow, and the job market is booming.

In this article, we look at the current state of the housing market in Dallas, what it may look like in 2020, and how your credit score affects your chances of getting a home loan on good terms.  

 

 

Current State Of The Dallas Housing Market

Home values took a slight dip back in April, which many experts attribute to value decreases in the West Coast markets. The net effect of that is that housing prices decreased in the Dallas-Fort Worth area as well. While the drop in prices is relatively small, (0.1%), it points to changes coming to the housing sector.

According to Zillow, housing prices in the Dallas-Fort Worth area dropped slightly back in April, which is the first decline reported since January of 2012.

Also, the information provided by Dallas-Fort Worth real estate agents suggests a month-to-month decline in median home prices.

According to Dallas News

So far in 2019, the median sales price of single-family homes sold by agents in North Texas is up 2% from the first four months of 2018. Zillow said that in April, the “typical U.S. home is worth $226,800.” That’s less than the $243,900 value in the DFW area.

While the housing market is slowing, with the average number of days on the market at about 53 in the North Texas region, experts caution people to not panic just yet because overall, home prices are increasing.

While Zillow says the Dallas market is “cool” they also call for a 7.5% rise in the median home price in 2019, which puts the market on an upward swing.

DM Magazine says: 

The reason for that is simple. There are jobs here, and tens of thousands of people are still moving to this area looking to land those jobs. The Bureau of Labor Statistics says 102,500 new jobs were created in 2018. There are now 3.7 million people in this area going to work every day.

The jobs are here in Dallas, and Texas continues to lead the country in job creation, so the housing market, for the time being, is healthy. If this competitive market worries you’re you about not being able to afford a home, you still have the option of getting something cheaper as you move away from the downtown area.

Affordability isn’t just a problem here in the Dallas area, but throughout the major markets around the country too. Generally speaking, the further away you move from the major metro areas, the better the deals you can find.

 

Predictions For 2020

While the above data paints a conflicting picture, what can be predicted for the housing market in the Dallas Fort-Worth area next year is that the low inventory and high demand will keep the market very competitive for the next few years. 

The strong economy here is giving the real estate market a healthy boost, which should keep prices from dipping too much in 2020. Lastly, according to the experts at Zillow, they predict a gain of 4.8% in the market through the summer of 2020.

As you can see, there’s no reason to panic right now, as the market looks strong throughout the better part of next year.

credit score in dallas

 

Credit Scores & Your Home Loan

If you’re not familiar with how credit scores work, here’s a brief rundown. Credit reporting agencies determine your credit score based on a few factors, including:

  • Your credit to debt ratio
  • They type of credit you have
  • Timeliness of payments
  • If you’ve filed for bankruptcy

Credit reporting agencies look at this information and derive a number that gives lenders an idea of your creditworthiness. 

The typical FICO score breaks down like this: 30% is based on how much you owe; 35% is based on your payment history; 15% is based on the length of your credit history; 10% is based on new credit you’ve acquired, and 10% is based on the types of credit you have.

Your credit score not only tells the lender whether you’re worthy of credit or not but also the interest rate you pay. A high credit score usually means a low-interest rate, while a low score means a high-interest rate.

Lenders differ on what they consider the baseline for good credit, but in general, a score of 700 or above is deemed to be excellent and will net you the most favorable terms. Once you dip down into the 600s, lenders see you as a high risk. For some lenders, a score of 660 or below is a ‘no’ for a loan, so this is why it’s imperative you maintain a good credit rating.

 

How To Fix A Bad Score

So let’s say you want to buy a home, but your credit score won’t allow you to get a loan or will get you one on terrible terms. What can you do to fix it?

The first step is to:

Get a copy of your credit report to make sure there aren’t any errors that are dragging your score down. 

Next, the most important thing you can do to get your score moving in the right direction is to pay every bill on time. Making timely payments is the quickest way to improve your score. Remember to pay down debts quickly, which often means making more than the minimum payment each time.

As you can see, your credit score is essential to getting a home loan on good terms. And, if your score isn’t where it should be, you’re better off holding off on getting a loan until you can improve it. If you need help, contact a credit repair Dallas company to get you back on track and into the home of your dreams.